Folklore opens new vistas for understanding what counts as normal. Studies of disability by folklorists are especially provocative for their critiques of ableism, challenging concepts of cultural competence. This March 25, 2022 webinar, sponsored by the AFS Fellows, features Nora Groce, Phyllis May-Machunda, and Anand Prahlad, who are joined by scholars from both folklore and disability studies in a roundtable discussion following the presentations.

An independent library and archive, physically based in the South West of the UK, with a website managed by dedicated volunteers, which aims to preserve and digitize an ever-growing repository of research material in the field of folklore for future generations of researchers.

In this short video, folklorist Norma Elia Cantú explains why she is a folklorist. “I believe in the human spirit, and I believe the work we do nurtures that spirit.” Norma explains why it’s so important to proclaim the name folklorist in

The Society received a two-year grant from the Teagle Foundation as part of its “Big Questions and the Disciplines” initiative. The Foundation received over 60 pre-applications, invited 15 applicants to submit full proposals, and funded five organizations nationwide. This initiative provides grants to support

AFS managed four two-year grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to create a scholarly edition of the James Madison Carpenter Collection, a groundbreaking collection of folk music, song, drama, dance, narrative, and children’s folklore documented in England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland

A web portal that provides access to online, open-access resources for folklore studies, including core journals of the field, open-access journals, digitized books, conference proceedings and papers, educational materials, and gray literature, including a collection of AFS publications like annual programs.

Suggest a resource

Have a resource you think might be helpful to your fellow folklorists or cultural workers? Share it with us!