Folklore opens new vistas for understanding what counts as normal. Studies of disability by folklorists are especially provocative for their critiques of ableism, challenging concepts of cultural competence. This March 25, 2022 webinar, sponsored by the AFS Fellows, features Nora Groce, Phyllis May-Machunda, and Anand Prahlad, who are joined by scholars from both folklore and disability studies in a roundtable discussion following the presentations.

An independent library and archive, physically based in the South West of the UK, with a website managed by dedicated volunteers, which aims to preserve and digitize an ever-growing repository of research material in the field of folklore for future generations of researchers.

Folklorists can be key, not only for communities where their cultures are at risk of disappearing, but also in preparing communities to receive newcomers. This workshop digs into the ways you can be involved in addressing the impact of climate change. It was led by Maida Owens (Louisiana Folklife Program and the Bayou Culture Collaborative) on February 22, 2022.

Publore is a communication platform for the public folklore community to discuss issues of concern to public folklore, such as requests for information or assistance, job postings, announcements of events, exhibits and publications.

Folkwise brings together a community of folklorists to leverage social media and outreach through an informal educational model, seeking to engage with audiences at every level. COVID-19 foregrounded the importance of community building and formation through digital spaces. As digital natives working

At the 2020 AFS Annual Meeting, folklorists Andrea Kitta and Virginia Siegel hosted a workshop that introduced attendees to the world of Twitter, the social media platform that has become the digital communications tool of choice for everyone from scholars to pop

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